Football team helps out at 11th Annual Crop Walk

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Contributed

Hoping to make a difference, members of the varsity football team participate in the Crop Walk at Ballou Park on Oct. 7. The team helped raise money to fight poverty and hunger in Danville and around the world. ”It felt good to do it, because we had the chance to help those in need,” Deadrian Towler, 11, said.

Pascual Morales, Staff Writer

The 11th Annual Crop Walk was held Oct. 7 at Ballou Park to raise funds for God’s Storehouse and Church World Service to fight poverty and hunger in Danville and around the world.

Since the fundraiser was begun in 2008, the crop walk has raised more than $160,000 and will continue to raise more every year. George Washington’s Key Club and HOSA volunteered to help out at the event, handing out refreshments, holding signs, and participating in the mile walk.

“It’s all about service,” Librarian and Key Club Sponsor Kim Robertson said. “God’s Storehouse is a very important asset to the community and we try and help them gather the money for food, which goes to our own community.”

President of the Key Club Emma Byrnes said helping others is important, even when there is no self-benefit. The Key Club has participated in the walk since 2013.

“It’s to help the community and benefit the people around us to show that, as a community, we can do better,” Byrnes said.

HOSA Sponsor Lisa Argyrakis said her students wanted to bring awareness of hunger, not only in the world, but in their very own community.

“We all know that there are starving kids right here in Danville, and they come to school every day,” Argyrakis said. “This program helps my students, not only in volunteerism, but to bring awareness to them about their own community.”

Beth Bauman, head of the Crop Walk Fundraiser since its debut in 2008, said watching people come together for such a cause is what motivates her to keep moving forward. “Sometimes people are more generous if it is a walk for cancer, or Alzheimer’s, or autism, or suicide because they have a very personal connection with it. But we keep at it year after year like the ‘little engine that could’ and over time, the money we raise is significant.”